EVENT: Cars and Craft July 2019

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It seems like August happened in the blink of an eye, and the same thing with July for that matter. Every year it feels like there is more stuff happening, making it harder to squeeze car shows in between it all. Car shows have an opportunity cost just to attend and its even more of an opportunity cost to actual have your car in the event. In Minnesota, our car season is fleeting, we get only half of the year to experience it so everything is more crammed together into a 5 month window. There is so much happening at once, you would think that Minnesota would experience an over saturation effect.

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Over saturation can make everything become an overwhelming cacophony. The Chronicles had a really good description of the mindset of people from the SoCal car scene, a notoriously over saturated car community, it is a bit of a longer rear but here is the link if you’re keen on reading it. In the article Joey talks about how they have such over saturation in their car community that everything becomes bland and you take it for granted. I can’t help to mutter “must be nice” to myself while I slide towards my annual September neurotic state which leads directly into a micro-midlife crisis for a good portion of October.

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The whole point of the Chronicles monologue is about how over saturation creates a rat race where too many people latch onto the current trend and rush their builds. They care more about getting seen at shows more than they care about the quality of their build. Instead of building something that is meant to last, like this hot rod.

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If you look at the car community in Minnesota, as a community we don’t really have any of the over saturation that California has. Going back to my own Kübler-Ross model of grieving for the car season, we have just over half of the year where we aren’t being bombarded with events. In California, where people are slapping shoddy work together to try to keep up with the Joneses, Winter gives us plenty of time to sit in the garage with a wrench and a pile of parts.

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Then after 7 months of not having car things to do, we get out enjoy even the small shows like Cars & Craft more than other regions ever could. As we’ve said time and again, this is the best monthly series in the midwest and it never fails to disappoint. So we’re going to spotlight some of the cars that caught our eye back in July. There is always a new twist at Cars & Craft, for July, it was Lowriders as Uso Twin Cities brought out a solid selection of cars.

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If you’re new to Lowriders, Uso is one of the largest clubs in North America with over 30 chapters. They’re celebrating their 25th anniversary this year and, in that quarter century of lowriding, they’ve been crowned Club of the Year by Lowrider magazine several times, broken down stereotypes and reset the bar for quality time and again. There was a period in the mid-2000s where you couldn’t pick up a single Lowrider magazine without seeing at least one Uso car featured between the covers.

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Back in the 1990s, lowriding had developed a name for being synonymous with gangsters but the community has worked hard to completely expunge themselves of that stereotype. Lowriding is an art form that extends far beyond what we normally imagine, you can find lowrider bicycles, motorcycles, pedal cars, wagons and even strollers. Even if you look within lowrider cars alone, there are plenty of styles that the style’s roots touch. Bombas, minitrucks, euro lowriders are all well known and you can extend slabs and donks into the same family tree as well.

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The lowrider community has always had it’s own allure since its origins with pachucos in the 1940s. Since the 1990’s when it hit it’s mainstream popularity peak, lowriders have become the trump card of car shows, it’s almost impossible to compete with a well executed lowrider. In the last few years, lowriders have been catching a second wind as well with even more hype behind them and this is one of the most exciting times in the last 20 years to be following the community.

SW20 MR2 Red

Another trend catching a second wind, but doesn’t have anywhere near the same cachet as lowriders are body kit builds. I’ve been seeing more rumblings of big body kit cars making a come back. To be honest, this SW20 MR2 actually pulls its Veilside C-I body kit off rather well. I don’t think things like the Black Widow CRX kits will ever come back, but the higher quality ones that accent the factory bodywork do give me a nostalgic feeling. It reminds me of being in middle school and slipping a Modified Magazine inside of my Algebra textbook. My teacher always wondered why I loved math so much but never did well in the class.

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If body kits aren’t your thing, Doku’s Integra might be a bit more palatable. His car is a much more functional build with Kosei K1s, carbon fiber fenders and a high revving NA B-series build. Originally built for more illicit forms of motorsport, the car looks exceptional. Usually cars built for long trips to Mexico look like hell but Doku breaks the mold in that way.

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Alex Nelson was showing off his newly acquired set of Mugen CF-48s for his EC1 CRX. They were clad in 25 year old Yokohama A-008Rs, one of Yokohama’s highest performance tires of the mid-1990’s. While it’s cool to see those, they’re a bit of a relic so he is currently waiting on a set of JDM Yokohama Advan HF Type-Ds. If you’re not an old school tire nerd, Yokohama just started reproduction of their original Advan street performance tire a couple of years ago but they’re only sold in Japan currently.

Red EM1 Si

Another really good Honda at the show was Sean’s EM1, which has been around in Minnesota for a while. At first glance the car looks rather plain but when you look up close, you find all the extensive work that has gone into the car. It has been one of the better Honda show cars in terms of build execution and overall cleanliness for years now and Sean has had it for what must be the better part of a decade at this point. It looks like Sean has added a very meaty front tire setup, so maybe he has plans for some track time as well.

Datsun Z S30 Front

I honestly have no idea who owns this 280Z. It looks like it is still a work in progress but it already is looking excellent. The fiberglass air dam looks great and the paint is an older respray but it holds its luster well. Hopefully the owner has some exciting plans for it. This would break necks with a refinished front bumper and some Watanabes.

Infiniti Q45 Front

John Krueger never disappoints with his VIP builds. His Infiniti Q45 is a very traditional style and very well executed. He doesn’t bring his car out to everything and isn’t trying to prove anything either, he just builds cars for himself. He has an incredible eye for detail, note the reworked wheel arches and how they seamlessly blend into the doors and front bumper. This is a build that you could easily dismiss if you don’t know what you’re looking for and that might well be it’s best quality.

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Yeng from Kateng brought out this really cool Honda CB200 that he apparently owns. I’ve never seen it around before but it is a really good cafe racer build and it’s tiny displacement engine has an exhaust note that is akin to that of an extremely angry moped. Everyone builds big engine bikes but the smaller ones, I think, are a lot more exciting because you just never see them and, when well put together, they create quite the ruckus.

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Before I close out, I always do a few shots in the spectator lot just to toy with the settings I want to use during the show. This Element SC was pretty interesting. We don’t see too many Elements being built, but the big toaster is one of the few crossovers that can be cool if done right. It is also one of the few crossovers that you can get with a manual transmission and AWD.

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In California, so many people seem to be complaining about something or worried about some trite issue almost constantly, but in Minnesota, that just doesn’t really happen. Joey from the Chronicles nailed it, when he said that people are too busy trying to make a brand out of themselves. The differentiating factor that Minnesotans have, has something to do with the camaraderie that we have. We know that were all in the same boat and we’re living in the “wrong state” for our lifestyles.

Toyota Celisor Night

Minnesota is far from the wrong state to be a car enthusiast, we do more than just fine and when everyone else losing their minds, we are thriving. The perspective gained when comparing how we operate as a whole to how other states operate is profound. When everyone else is in a rat race, we’re just out having a good time and loving cars the way we were intended to, with friends, family, food and good beer. Our community is excellent and I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

EVENT: Back to the 80’s 2019

The abundance of interesting things at BTT80’s is one of the show’s strong suits. It brings out a lot of the obscure cars around the state that you just don’t see anywhere else. The show isn’t just a bunch of Fieros, C4 Corvettes and dudes walking around in tube socks with jorts. While yes, those things exist at BTT80’s, there were also some of the weirdest things you just don’t see at other shows.

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I went to the first Back to the 80’s back when they were hosting it up in Blaine. It was pretty cool to see the show happen but, good lord, you don’t realize how far away Blaine is from Minneapolis until you sit in traffic for an hour and a half in a CRX without AC just to go walk around in a hot parking lot for the rest of the day. It was a sign of things to come though, the organizers had more passion for that show than I’ve seen in most other shows.

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Fast forward to 2019, the show is now in Burnsville, still a third ring suburb but much easier to reach. The word has gotten out and the sponsors have been coming out of the woodwork, the organization has improved drastically and the show itself has exploded in size.

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Going to the show for the first time in years, I was worried about it being another parking lot show. That being said, it didn’t feel like it was in a parking lot. Of course, it was cloudy, which did help but I didn’t feel like I was walking across the entire Earth to get from one end to the other end. I could walk from Shane’s Celica to the food trucks, effectively across the show, and I wasn’t looking off into the horizon to find something worth looking at.

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The abundance of interesting things at BTT80’s is one of the show’s strong suits. It brings out a lot of the obscure cars around the state that you just don’t see anywhere else. The show isn’t just a bunch of Fieros, C4 Corvettes and dudes walking around in tube socks with jorts. While yes, those things exist at BTT80’s, there were also some of the weirdest things you just don’t see at other shows. This Ford EXP is a prefect example, I had never seen one in the flesh until this show. Apparently the owner owns a dozen of these, the majority are parts cars to support the runners, and as the owner of an obscure 80’s car, I feel his pain.

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Cars like this Pontiac Tojan were there, speaking of weird things that you just don’t see. The Tojan was supposed to be a Ferrari fighter based off of the F-Body platform with a heavily modified TPI V8, vastly improved handling and Gotti wheels. Unfortunately given that the Pontiac name didn’t have the cachet of the Ferrari name, less than 150 were produced. There might be a day when the Tojan just explodes in value, remember Duesenbergs were once totally forgotten too.

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Next to the Tojan was my personal favorite car of the show. The world’s cleanest V20 generation Toyota Camry. This car was never intended to be preserved, it’s shocking to see one in this good of condition. The V20 Camry holds a place in my heart, not only was it the first car I learned to do spark plugs on but its actually a really cool car when you start to look into them. I actually did an in depth history of this car for Japanese Nostalgic Car a couple of years ago, you can find the link here.

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Talking to the owner of it, he said that it was actually an eBay buy. The car had an insane reserve price, so the current owner PM’ed the seller to drop the price a bit, after some back and forth it became his and for a much more reasonable price. While I still am confused as to why this was preserved to such a level, I couldn’t be any happier about the results and his buying process was totally within the spirit of Carbitrage. Our friend of the show that I was walking aroung with, Darren Brooke, described the car as “profoundly beige” and that it was the “essence of the color beige.”

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One more insanely rare car goes back to GM, or rather Suzuki, for one of the coolest cars I’ve known about but never expected to actually see in real life, The Chevrolet Sprint Turbo. This is a 3 cylinder captive imported Suzuki Cultus featured a turbocharger and possibly the smallest intercooler I’ve ever seen in my life.

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Here is a picture of said intercooler with Josh Stowell’s hand for scale, like I said, comically small. With the 8 psi of additional boost and a large dollop of torque steer, the Sprint Turbo reached 70 HP and a shockingly fast 8.1 second 0-60 time. For reference, thats faster than the last years of the C3 Corvette, the AW11 MR2 non-supercharged and even an E30 325i.

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Anyway, this car went through a complete engine out restoration and is likely the best Chevrolet Sprint in existence. If I recall correctly, the owner’s efforts resulted in a first place finish for the Captive Import category of the show.

Grand National Stage 2

Outside of the weird stuff floating around the show, there were so many C4 Corvettes, 3rd generation Trans-maro-birds and G-bodies that it would make your head spin. They likely accounted for at least 10% of the show but what felt good about it is that they appeared in smaller clumps and it made it a bit easier to take in. With so many cars, some were easy to walk past while others were rather unique. This Regal T-Type was a great example, judging by the chrome trim, I don’t think it was actually a Grand National or GNX but with the drag radials in the back and massive exhaust, it looked like it could boogie.

I do have to mention the C4 for a moment because there were a lot of them. Some of them looked slapped together with coathanger exhausts but, cars like this Lingenfelter ZR1, were in amazing condition. We forget how important the ZR1 was for the Corvette when it came out, it brought the Corvette back into the limelight after people had written it off for the better part of a decade. The ZR1 sported an aluminum V8 with DOHC 32 Valve head and 375 HP from the factory. The Lingenfelter version even expanded that an extra 100 HP, making it one of the most powerful cars you could purchase in the early 1990’s.

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Of all the manufacturers from Asia, one brand in particular was able to create more consistently great cars than any other, Toyota. The Toyotas in show were excellent, a handful of trucks were there, a few Mk2 Supras and every variant Celica sold in the 80s. Getting a good look at the white MA61 Celica Supra at the DJ booth was entirely worth experience all of the 110 decibels of Huey Lewis coming out of those speakers behind it.

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Outside of the Supras, the 80’s Celicas were all pretty great, albeit not the fastest thing in the world but they’re 80’s cars, it likely never will be the fastest thing around. Instead, for very little money a Celica can get you into something that is fun, bulletproof reliable and easy on the eyes. This red A40 Celica falls deeply into the podium of best A40s I’ve ever seen, not just in Minnesota but have seen at all.

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The first car I saw when I pulled into the show was this ST185 Celica. At first, I saw it and thought that it was a nifty little GT Four clone, it had the right bumpers, hood and even graphics. Then the owner got out and I saw that it was RHD, it was a real ST185 GT Four and further more was a GT Four RC, the highest trim level with the widebody and AWD. The owner and his girlfriend were wonderful people, extremely friendly and were thrilled to show off their car in the show.

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Robert Correll brought out his Hello Kitty Itasha Suzuki Alto Works. Fun fact, me and Jana have almost bought this car on several accounts but the logistics never worked out, it was either posted for sale when we were out of town or right after we had just bought a car. I am really happy to see it went to a good home and Robert has done a great job expanding on it’s theme. When we were at the show this little girl came up to Jana and poked her on the butt asking if she owned the car, the girl was rather shocked when a tall mustachioed man turned out to be it’s owner.

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If you’re not familiar with a Suzuki Alto Works, it is a kei hot hatch. It was government limited to 60 HP but you can easily double the stock output with bolt on parts. The car came in either FWD or AWD and was manual only. If you want a more in depth description of the Alto Works, I have an article here at Japanese Nostalgic Car. The Alto Works is most definitely a Carbitrage Top Buy.

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Speaking of imported cars, we should probably mention the R32 Skyline. To stand out with an R32 GTR today, you have to have something really special, I found the coolest and most special GTR I’ve seen yet. This is an actual Tommykaira R32R, one of 400 ever made. These were $76,000 when new back in 1992, that was double what the standard GT-R retailed for. For those who are unfamiliar with the brand, this is to the GT-R what RUF is to Porsche.

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It came with a bespoke bodykit, wheels, interior accents and was tuned to make more power while still being just as driveable as a standard GT-R. Unfortunately the owner didn’t have the Tommykaira wheels on the car. Apparently, the night before the show he discovered a loose wheel face bolt. With dozens of bolts holding the wheel face on, he didn’t have the time to make sure every bolt was torqued correctly and didn’t want to damage the car so he threw on his spare wheels.

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Naturally with a show featuring 80’s cars, we were bound to see a lot of the first wave of modified trucks, sky high Toyota pickups, the last clean Bronco II, both generations of Subaru BRAT and some wild paint jobs were to be seen.

C1500 Diesel

Without any doubt, the one that caught our eye was this slammed C1500 with a choptop, a FedEx truck Detroit Diesel engine coming out of the hood and in the bed, not only smokestacks but two fog horns out of an old supertanker that was scuttled in Duluth. This truck is every bit as ridiculous as it is awesome.

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So not only is this arguably the best Cabriolet in existence but it also has a cool story to it. Chad Erickson, the owner of SCI, originally built this with his dad back in the 90’s and it’s still in the family. It still has the Calloway turbo kit on it that they installed over 20 years ago and it is still going strong. Chad posts regularly about cruising around in it with his mom, his kids and, fun fact, he can even fit his BMX bike in the back.

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Back to the 80’s has grown massively since it’s inception. I am really happy to see what it has done, it’s a testament to the commitment of the hosts. Growing from a small show put on by the local Minnesota Fiero club to something that can take up nearly a quarter of the parking available at one of the largest malls in Minnesota is nothing to scoff at. It is a unique show in of itself too, kind of a combination of Concours of Lemons and Radwood. I really have to say, if you didn’t go this year then you have to go next year. Even if you don’t particularly care for 80’s cars, there is still something there for everyone.

VANNING IS BACK: CHARIOTS OF THE GODS 2018

Sidepipes, mag wheels and murals of wizards were once the hallmarks of the ultimate vehicular form of self expression of the 1970s and ’80s. This summer, on the hottest day of August, we explored this subculture at the Chariots of the Gods Custom Van and Vintage Camper Show at Vinyl-Lux Upholstery.

Brown G10

Sidepipes, mag wheels and murals of wizards were once the hallmarks of the ultimate vehicular form of self expression of the 1970s and ’80s. While the vanning craze of the malaise era eventually fell into obscurity, around the world the culture carried on. In Japan you can find custom vans ranging from wild bosozoku builds to even track built vans, Europe has a subset of van culture as well and Brazil, well let’s just say the Volkswagen Type 2 stayed in production until 2013 for a reason. Meanwhile in America, if we fast forward 35 years from when van culture left off, we began to see some millennials seeking adventure rediscovering what they called “#vanlife” and traveling the country while working remotely. Over the course the last few years the stigma of the clapped-out ex-plumber owned Chevy G20 “Rape Van”  began to dissolve as a rediscovery of classic vanning bubbled to the surface of pop culture.

Bill Jaap Van Collection

This summer, on the hottest day of August, we explored this subculture at the Chariots of the Gods Custom Van and Vintage Camper Show at Vinyl-Lux Upholstery. We started our journey accompanying Bill Jaap from Good Carma caravaning his personal fleet of Volkswagen vans to the show. The fleet included a water-cooled Vanagon Westfalia, and a pair of Type 2 bay window vans in Riviera and Westfalia form. Good Carma is a shop that specializes in Volkswagen, Audi and Subaru repair and is one of only a handful of shops in the midwest that are well versed with Volkswagen aircooled and waterboxer engines.

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Once at the show the vans were parked with tops up with the exception of the Riviera which was clad with a well suited surfboard. There was even a Volkswagen themed game of cornhole was set out as well. Even Jordan from Van Go, came by the Good Carma camp to join in the fun.

Mellow Yellow

Second to the Americans, Volkswagen’s offerings were the most prevalent. This wasn’t a coincidence though because, in the hands of hippies during the 1960’s the Type 2 became the catalyst to what would become American van culture. While the American vans fell out of favor with the general public, the classic aircooled Volkswagen van has always been one of the most iconic cult classic vehicles and have only become more sought after now that vanning is becoming popular again.

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As we’ve stated on the podcast, the Vanagon is one of the most popular Volkswagen vans and can be very desirable if you can come across a properly cared for example. It’s just modernized enough to be a viable roadtrip vehicle on American highways but isn’t so modernized that it loses the allure of the classic Type 2. While the original Vanagon was aircooled, there are diesel and watercooled variants as well so take your pick. This van shown above is a watercooled version kitted out with larger steel wheels from GoWesty and a Fiamma awning for a superior camping experience. Note the swing away cooler in the rear of the van, likely from GoWesty as well.

TC Vans G20

Once we worked up the courage to exit the functional air conditioning of the Vanagon we began to walk around. The vast majority of the vans in show were the American full sized vans you typically equate with American vanning culture. Something made in the 70’s or 80’s by The Big 3 modified in period style. This is not without precedent since the Twin City Vans club has been around since the 1970s, which makes them a strong contender for oldest car club in Minnesota, along with the MSRA.

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With a number of long time members still rocking 70s era vans, the newer members have plenty of guidance. The shocking thing about this show is the amount of well preserved vans, even modern builds follow the preservation of the original style largely. This Orange Dodge Tradesman looks the part with its Cragar wheels, body kit, sun visor and mural. In fact there are matching murals on each side.

While the driver side mural features the van venturing into the sunset, the passenger side shows the van coming out through a mountain pass. Creative paint work like this is rarely seen these days on builds. Before anyone asks, no that is not a vinyl wrap or anything, it’s an actual airbrush work which is even more impressive.

Orange Dodge Interior

Wood covered walls, a solid sound system and a tucked and buttoned velvet roof with matching seat cushions make this Orange tradesman a bad ass mobile living room. These vans come from an era when you didn’t build your car for instagram likes, then move onto the next project, your van was your form of self expression.

Etheral Goat Van

The van was your Instagram page, people saw it and they saw what you were about. Did you like Rush? Why not paint the 2112 album cover on the side. Was Dungeons & Dragons your thing? Then you had better deck out that van with couches and a table with a dice tower built in it. A van was a mobile living room for anything you could think of, from adventuring through the world, to tailgating at concerts and everything in between. Many of these had couches, beds, TVs, CB Radios and everything, sometimes even including the kitchen sink.

Brown Dodge Interior.jpg

Frankly the interiors of these vans are more important than the exteriors. While it’s cool to look at them, you spend your time inside of it rather than the outside. They’re made to be used. While the Orange van had an excellent interior, some were even more wild. There was a brown Dodge van with a shag interior that was honestly more comfortable looking than my own house. Note the stained glass sconces in the corners and the rotating captains chairs.

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The table in the back looked infinitely comfy to chill out at. The lighting in the van is also something to behold with a swivel spotlight in the cabin and mood lighting throughout. The interior of this exudes the 1970s from the color palate to the shag carpet on everything.

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I believe this van was an original van from back in the 1970s but was either restored or perfectly preserved. The porthole window in the back was one of dozens of styles you could get from circles to hearts and I’m not even kidding but that footprint gas pedal shape was an option as well.

Barn Find Van

Nate Van Hofwegen, the showrunner of Chariots of the Gods, picked up this 1974 Dodge Tradesman from the original owner who received it from his parents as a high school graduation gift. They had purchased it new in 1974 and had it modified before giving it to their son, this may go down as one of the coolest graduation gifts of all time. The mural, by Bruce White, is quite well preserved for it’s age and we can all be happy that this van is in good hands with Nate.

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If you’ve noticed there was an abundance of Mopar vans being featured, that was true, there were a lot of Dodge B series vans. While it was the last brand to the van party, they were ready to embrace the trend offering a plethora of engines ranging from 225 slant-6 to the 440 Magnum V8 and options of manual or automatic transmissions.  After muscle cars were strangled with emissions devices, the rules weren’t as strict for trucks and vans so Dodge started to put their performance engines into those platforms. They had a line called the “Adult Toys” line most famously making the Lil Red Express and Midnight Express trucks, but they also featured a trim level of the B series called the Street Van. In the mid-1970’s this van had it all with options for custom interior patterns, chrome wheels, porthole windows and an official owner’s club called the “Dodge Van Clan.”

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It wasn’t just Dodge that offered factory custom vans. This more modestly built Chevrolet G20 was a very well preserved example of an upscale trim of the first face lift the third generation G series van. The third generation G series van, much like the Dodge B series, embraced van culture and from 1973-1977 offered an extensive catalog of customization options with shag interior and even side pipes from the factory. GM had a deal where a company called Van-Tastic supplied custom accessories through their dealerships. Later on it’s lifespan the G series would become famous for becoming the A-Team van.

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Although there were factory supported custom vans, seeing just how wild people could get when they put their minds to it shows just what you can do with these American vans as a platform. This green Dodge van caught my eye from across the show with it’s gullwing door, custom interior and body kit. This van really had it all, the vertically mounted window between the gullwing door and front door is just an additional added touch that set this van apart too.

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Although the third generation Chevy G series vans were the most iconic GM vans, there was a single second generation G series van that was in show. While it was unique because of it’s model, it also had the best name of any van in the show.

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It’s name was the Road Toad. Maybe I’m the only one that finds that name immensely entertaining. What I think we can all appreciate though is that excellent work they did with the stained glass rear windows. I really wish we still gave our cars such excellent names publicly.

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The G series wasn’t GM’s first foray into the van segment however. That honor would have to go to the Corvair based Greenbriar van. This was the most unique domestic van in show with more in common with the Volkswagen Type 2s than anything else due to it’s aircooled flat 6 engine. The modifications to this van were minor but with the tinted high beams, mag 5-spoke wheels and custom antenna, it looked like it had driven out from the background of a Steve McQueen movie.

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Today, if you’re trying to find a classic American van, the Econoline is likely your best bet to find. These stayed in production until 2014 with a direct timeline that didn’t end until the English Transit van took over it’s position. It wasn’t a fall from grace like the other brands either because the Transit is one kick ass vehicle. The classic Econoline however, has a place in the hearts of FoMoCo loving van aficionados everywhere though. The third generation Econoline was unique in that it was the only full size van until the 90s to use a body on frame construction, in lieu of a monocoque design. While the lack of a monocoque made it’s cargo floor taller in comparison to the other domestic vans, it likely added to the longevity of the van because it was more modular for fleet use. That being said, a slightly higher floor has in no way stopped vanners from doing what they do.

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The fourth generation Econoline remained largely unchanged from 1991 until 2014. Existing completely beyond the vanning craze, these have largely been ignored but they can be just as solid of a platform as any other van. This late model Econoline was one of a handful at Chariots of the Gods and was definitely the most eye catching. That mural was hand painted as well, it’s amazing how much these can transform.

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Although hand painted murals were king at the show, there was a place for vinyl wraps as well. This Dodge Tradesman had one of the best vinyl wraps I’ve ever seen at any show, not just van shows either. Although too wild for some, I think this van was a good example of blending classic and modern.

Outside of classic American vans and offerings from Volkswagen, there was a sole Japanese offering, in form of a Mitsubishi Delica. If there was ever to be a single van to represent Japanese vans, the Delica would certainly be on the shortlist. Mitsubishi has historically had a penchant for offroading so of course the Delica would come with 4WD, lifted suspension and knobbly tires from the factory. Mitsubishi’s other penchant in the 80’s/90’s was for technology, so feeding into that, the Delica is loaded to the gills with the tech of the era including an ice box for keeping drinks chilled, front and rear climate control and plenty of other gadgets for trekking through the wilderness. Of course I would be remiss to not mention the four sunroofs you get as well.

Stretch Tandem van Side

From mild to wild, domestic or import, new or old, Chariots of the Gods celebrated everything that makes vanning great. The popularity of custom vans is growing despite the hiatus they took in the American car culture’s eye. Chariots of the Gods also keeps an open mind to other styles of van culture as well, so if it’s a Mystery Machine Econoline or a Van Kulture VIP-style Sienna, all are welcome at this show. So far every year that we’ve been to Chariots of the Gods it has been growing and we look forward to being there next year.

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